Current Evidence-Based Rehabilitation Protocols for Total Joint Replacements

Course Content

Total learning: 2 lessons / 1 quiz Time: 52 weeks

Current Evidence-Based Rehabilitation Protocols for Total Joint Replacements , Course Objectives

Course Objectives:

  1. Compare and contrast distinguishing characteristics of 3 types of arthritis, which can lead to the need for total joint replacement.
  2. Briefly describe 2 roadblocks to cost containment for total joint replacements.
  3. Describe 3-4 physical therapist interventions, which routinely occur during the pre- operative visit(s) for patients scheduled to undergo total joint replacements.
  4. List 2 recent innovations in total knee implants and/or surgical techniques.
  5. Describe 4 research-supported treatments, which can be performed during Phase I-IV of rehabilitation after a total knee replacement.
  6. List 2 recent innovations in total hip implants and/or surgical techniques.
  7. Describe 4 research-supported treatments, which can be performed during Phase I-IV of rehabilitation after a total hip replacement.
  8. Describe 3 distinctions, which should be made when treating a total hip replacement (anterior approach) versus a total hip replacement (posterior approach).
  9. List 2 recent innovations in total ankle implants and/or surgical techniques.
  10. Describe 4 research-supported treatments, which can be performed during Phase I-IV of rehabilitation after a total ankle replacement.
  11. List 2 recent innovations in total shoulder implants and/or surgical techniques.
  12. Describe 4 research-supported treatments, which can be performed during Phase I-IV of rehabilitation after a total shoulder replacement.

Course Description:

Over the last two decades, seismic gains have been made in the field of total joint replacement surgeries and post-surgical rehabilitation. Hip, knee, shoulder and even ankle joints are being partially or completely replaced with prosthetic joints with significant gains in both pain and function being realized. Interestingly, no longer are total joint arthroplasties the “property” of the very disabled or very old. These orthopedic surgeries are now being considered for very young patients, especially those with a history of juvenile rheumatoid arthritis or joint necrosis (Polkowski, Callaghan, Mont, & Clohisy, 2012; Keeney, Eunice, Pashos, Wright, & Clohisy, 2011).

The goal of this book is to give the reader a short, yet useful, evidence-supported overview of the state of total joint replacement surgeries (knee, hip, ankle and shoulder) and to “prime the pump” of clinical reasoning by providing rehabilitation protocols and suggested pathways.

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